Medical Schools in New Mexico

>> Complete list of medical schools in the US including medical school acceptance rates <<

This blog lists the medical schools located in New Mexico and outlines some features of the state which you should consider if you are applying to a medical school in New Mexico.

New Mexico offers you both urban and rural population bases to learn from. A large population of Native Americans and Latino Americans makes New Mexico an ideal state to consider studying if you are interested in exposure to diverse patient presentations from people of many backgrounds.

tags: Medical School, Medical Schools in New Mexico, Med Schools in New Mexico, New Mexico Medical Schools, Locations of Medical Schools in New Mexico

Medical Schools in Kansas

>> Complete list of medical schools in the US including medical school acceptance rates <<

This blog lists the medical schools located in Kansas and outlines some features of the state which you should consider if you are applying to a medical school in Kansas.

Kansas's population is distributed in urban and rural areas, allowing you to study medicine in different clinical settings. A state with a strong agricultural industry, and a history as a place of settlement for a variety of immigrant and Indigenous groups, Kansas's medical school will allow you to learn about many clinical presentations and prepare you for your career ahead.

tags: Medical School, Medical Schools in Kansas, Med Schools in Kansas, Locations of Medical Schools in Kansas, Kansas Medical Schools

Medical Schools in Mississippi

>> Complete list of medical schools in the US including medical school acceptance rates <<

This blog lists the medical schools located in Mississippi and outlines some features of the state which you should consider if you are applying to a medical school in Mississippi.

Mississippi's relatively smaller population and many suburban, exurban, and rural areas make it an ideal state to consider studying in if you are interested in learning about healthcare in these populations. Mississippi also has a relatively underserved population, healthcare- and health outcomes-wise, allowing you to learn how to practice medicine in more challenging circumstances.

tags: Medical School, Medical Schools in Mississippi, Med Schools in Mississippi, Locations of Medical Schools in Mississippi, Mississippi Medical Schools

PA vs. MD

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What is a PA, or Physician Assistant?

Before comparing PA and MD, we need to take a brief look at what, exactly, a Physician Assistant is and does. A Physician Assistant (PA) is a medical support professional, working under the supervision and delegation of a physician (MD). They participate directly in patient care, taking medical histories, examining and diagnosing patients, developing treatment plans, educating patients and working toward positive patient outcomes as an integral part of the healthcare team. Some of the differences between PA and MD depend on where you’re practicing (state/province/country), but, on the whole, PAs do not perform surgery (they can assist), they do not take on the most complex or acute medical cases, and they may or may not be able to prescribe medications (again, depending on location). There is a good deal of overlap between these two professions, but there are many key differences, as well. This blog will help you more fully understand the differences between becoming a Physician Assistant (PA) and becoming a Medical Doctor (MD), to help you determine which path best suits your own goals, needs, and aspirations.

PA vs. MD: General Summary

Physician Assistants have consistently high levels of job satisfaction, job stability, and work-life balance, while spending less time and money on school and having more opportunities to switch specializations than their MD colleagues. Following an undergraduate degree, most are able to begin practicing after an additional 2-3 years of education and do so with comfortable starting salaries ($75,000-80,000/year). On the other hand, PAs must have more healthcare experience at the beginning of their careers and do complex work for often-comparably long hours at lower wages than MDs. They have less independence and are in some ways dependent on physician oversight, and their profession as a whole is relatively new, compared to physicians, meaning the laws around their practice vary widely depending on state/province/country.

MDs, on the other hand, are some of the most esteemed and well-paid traditional professionals in our society. They have more autonomy than Physician Assistants and can start their own practices, and their profession is one of the most established of all human endeavors. Their high level of education offsets lower amounts of healthcare experience at the beginning of their career (compared to PAs), and the prestige of becoming a physician is undeniable. At the same time, they spend much more time and money on their education, resulting in higher amounts of debt. Following an undergraduate degree, it can take anywhere from 6-12 additional years of education before being able to practice. Once they are practicing, MDs tend to work longer hours than their PA counterparts, are more likely to do on-call work, and have lower job satisfaction and fewer options to change things up if they begin to burn out in their chosen specialty. Physicians who run their own practices must also take on employer and managerial roles on top of practicing medicine, which presents its own set of challenges, and MDs have greater liability all-around than PAs.

PA vs. MD: A Detailed Comparison

Let’s take a look at some of the more specific differences between pursing a PA and an MD. Below, we’ll explore the following:

  • Education and Cost
  • Roles and Duties
  • Specialization
  • Job Satisfaction, Work-Life Balance, and Burnout
  • Compensation
  • Flexibility and Control
tags: pa vs md, physician assistant, medical doctor, physician assistant vs medical doctor, physician assistant versus medical doctor, what is a pa, what is a physician assistant

How to Write Your Own Letter of Recommendation

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How to Write a Letter of Recommendation for Yourself

Requesting a letter of recommendation from a professor can be a daunting task. Even if you’ve been in several of their courses, submitted multiple projects to them, spent time with them in office hours, and exchanged basic pleasantries with them, it can be hard to feel confident in their evaluation of you. Students – even (or perhaps especially) top students – are notorious for their self-doubt. That’s not always a bad thing, as it keeps you striving to do more and do better, but it can lead to a significant under-evaluation of your successes, accomplishments, and overall standing as a student.

So, when you send that request for a letter of recommendation, it may be done with bated breath and a sense of uncertainty – What if they say no? What if they laugh at your request? What if they’ve just been being nice to you? Well, first things first: Relax. The latter two of these are highly unlikely, and if the former happens, it’s not necessarily the end of the world. You should be asking for letters from professors with whom you’ve been building rapport for some time – those in whose classes you’ve done well, those who have evaluated your work, and so on – and if you’ve built that rapport, there’s very little chance that they’ll say no. If you’re desperate for, say, a third letter-writer and are reaching out to any and every prof you’ve ever met, well, then you may get a “no”. But, unless you just completely bombed a course, those negative responses are often in your best interest. A professor will usually only refuse to write a letter if they feel they simply don’t know you and your work well enough to write you the kind of recommendation you need to actually succeed. You’ll need to search for someone else at that point, but that’s better than a poor or ineffective letter of recommendation! In any case, all of this points to the need to find quality letter-writers and build relationships with your professors throughout your time in university.

Beyond a Simple "Yes" or "No"

At this point, you may assume that your request for a letter of recommendation will be met with one of two answers: “Yes, happy to!” or, “No, sorry”. Well, things are actually a bit more complicated than that. Imagine seeing that reply to your request hit your inbox, taking a deep breath to brace yourself before opening it (“Please say yes, please say yes, please say yes…”), and then seeing this:

Hi! Sure, happy to help! Go ahead put together a draft and I’ll review and sign it.

tags: letter of recommendation, how to write your own letter of recommendation, writing your own letter of recommendation, how to write a letter of recommendation for yourself, writing a letter of recommendation for yourself

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