MCAT Psychology Ultimate Guide & Sample Questions in 2020

Updated: July 31, 2020

What do you need to know about the MCAT psychology and sociology section? This blog is the ultimate guide to understanding what is assessed within this section of the MCAT and how to successfully prepare for it. We also take a look at several psychology and sociology sample questions and provide an expert breakdown of the answers.

Students typically wonder why there is even a psychology and sociology section on the MCAT. The medical field has identified psychology and sociology as key factors that tomorrow’s doctors need to know in order to best serve a diverse patient population and to understand how behavior impacts health. Essentially, this section will look at your understanding of the patient as a whole and will better prepare medical students to build strong knowledge of a variety of health determinants. Studies have shown that integrating social and behavioral sciences in to your medical education, and into clinical practice, can improve both the health and health outcomes of patients. Future physicians must be prepared to respond to the ever-changing human and social aspects of medicine. Acing the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT will demonstrate to admissions committees that you are ready to meet this challenge!

Here's what you'll learn:

What is tested on the MCAT psychology and sociology section?

What does the MCAT psychology and sociology section look like?

How to prepare for the MCAT psychology and sociology section

Tips for the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT

Sample MCAT psychology and sociology questions

Answers to sample questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Conclusion

What is tested on the MCAT psychology and sociology section?

What academic disciplines are covered within the Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior section of the MCAT, or the psychology and sociology section for short? This section will contain approximately 65% introductory psychology questions, 30% introductory sociology questions, and 5% introductory biology questions combined with scientific inquiry and reasoning skills. This section incorporates concepts taught at many universities in first-semester psychology and sociology courses, as well as in introductory biology. Head over to our MCAT biology blog for sample questions and expert answers for the biology section of the test.

The psychology and sociology section covers the following foundational concepts:

  • Biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors influence behavior and behavior change (35%)
  • Biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors influence the ways that individuals perceive, think about, and react to the world (25%)
  • Psychological, sociocultural, and biological factors influence the way we think about ourselves and others, as well as how we interact with others (20%)
  • Cultural and social differences influence well-being (15%)
  • Social stratification and access to resources influence well-being (5%)

For a detailed list of the subtopics included within each foundational concept of the Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior section of the MCAT, check out the AAMC’s guide, what is on the MCAT exam?. Here is an overview of the main subtopics included in this section of the MCAT:

  • Sensation and perception of the environment
  • Neurobiology, cognition, and consciousness
  • Language development, learning, and memory
  • Responding to the world
  • Individual influences on behavior
  • Social processes that influence human behavior
  • Motivation and emotion
  • Self-identity and personality
  • Demographic characteristics and processes
  • Social thinking, attitudes, and behavior changes
  • Social structure/stratification, social interactions, and social inequality
  • Psychological disorders

To excel on the Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior section, you will need a solid knowledge base in each of these content areas. Knowing how to use psychology and sociology information to solve complex problems is the key to a great score on this section of the MCAT. According to the AAMC, the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT asks you to problem solve by combining your knowledge of foundational concepts with your scientific inquiry and reasoning skills. If you're wondering when to start studying for the MCAT, it will depend on how much knowledge you have retained from your introductory university classes. However, this MCAT section is about much more than just memorization. In addition to testing your content knowledge, the MCAT will also test your ability to pull relevant information from each passage you read, a deep understanding of the mechanisms behind the facts you have learned, and for an understanding of the psychosocial complexities of your future patients. You will be tested on your understanding of the relationships between social stratification and access to care and how psychological, social, and biological factors influence patient behavior and perceptions. The Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior section emphasizes concepts that physicians must know in order to serve an increasingly diverse patient population.

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What does the MCAT psychology and sociology section look like?

When you take the MCAT, the Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior section is the last of the four sections that you will complete and follows an optional ten-minute break. At this point, you have made it through three grueling sections, and you’re in the home stretch!

In this final MCAT section, you will have 95 minutes to answer 59 questions. Out of these 59 questions, 44 are passage-based. You will be presented with ten passages about psychology and sociology topics and you will be asked four to seven passage-based questions after each passage. There will also be 15 stand-alone discrete questions dispersed in between passages. Each question in this section will address one, or a few, of the four skills outlined by the AAMC: knowledge of scientific concepts and principles, scientific reasoning and problem-solving, reasoning about the design and execution of research, and data-based and statistical reasoning.

Interested in a detailed breakdown of how every minute will be allocated on test day? Check out our blog to find out "how long is the MCAT?"

How to prepare for the MCAT psychology and sociology section

Before you can design your MCAT study schedule for the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT, you will need to understand your baseline. To do this, you need to take a full-length MCAT diagnostic test. Don’t worry about trying to ace your diagnostic exam, the goal is just to understand exactly where you stand as you embark on your MCAT preparations. For your diagnostic, it's recommended to use a full-length exam from the AAMC website. Complete this practice exam in one sitting and, ideally, in an environment that mimics test-day conditions. Using a diagnostic MCAT will help to ensure that the study schedule you create will effectively address your strengths and areas for improvement. Use your diagnostic test results to guide your MCAT preparations by determining which areas you will need to focus on the most. In addition, this will help you answer the common question, "when should I take the MCAT?".

To get started, create an outline that breaks down each foundational concept that you will need to study. Rather than just putting “study psychology” on your to-do list, first break each content area down into manageable subjects. Use the AAMC’s list of subtopics as a guide and to ensure that there are no gaps in your preparation. For example, for the foundational concept of how cultural and social differences influence well-being, start by focusing one study session on a specific content category, such as the link between social structures and human interactions or the demographic characteristics that define a society. Investigate how a patient’s social and demographic background influences their perception of health and disease, as well as the efficacy of their health care team and therapeutic interventions. After covering each topic by reading your textbook or by reviewing course work, do a check-in and ensure that you feel comfortable explaining the information out loud to yourself without relying on any study materials. Continue this for each of the main foundational concepts. In addition, another great way to study is to make quizzes for yourself to test your content knowledge. Try to see if you can teach a friend the topic and practice with flashcards that you make yourself. While it is easier to purchase flashcards, making them yourself is a useful study strategy that helps to facilitate active learning.

After focusing the first half of your MCAT preparations on content review, check your progress by taking your next full-length MCAT practice test. Put your MCAT score into perspective and look up MCAT test dates that align with where you stand in your MCAT preparations. Switch gears now to the practice phase of your MCAT preparation: in the final months of your preparation, at least 70% of your study time should be spent completing MCAT practice questions.

One struggle with the MCAT psychology section is that it is the last section you will face on test day. The total seated time for the MCAT is just over seven and a half hours for students that use the optional breaks between sections. By the time you get to the fourth section of the MCAT, you will likely be drained, but your success depends on your ability to stay focused. In preparing for the MCAT, you will need to build up your endurance to remain focused for over seven hours of testing. How can you accomplish this? Deliberately, and gradually, work to build your endurance over the course of your months of MCAT preparation by using your study time to build up stamina. As you study, start to get comfortable sitting and studying for 95 minutes straight. Over time, work up to studying for four 95-minute periods in a row with short breaks in between just like on test day.

Looking for more MCAT preparation tips? Check out our ultimate guide to preparing for the MCAT and need-to-know MCAT basics.

Check out our video to learn when to start studying for the MCAT:


Tips for the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT

Before getting into some practice questions, take a look at our tips for mastering the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT:

Tip #1: Understand the skills being tested

When answering MCAT questions, it can be helpful to first identify the question type, or skills being tested. The AAMC has defined four skills that are tested in each of the four MCAT sections:

1. Knowledge of scientific concepts and principles, or “Do you remember specific science content?”

2. Scientific reasoning and problem-solving, or “Can you apply multiple content areas to new situations?”

3. Reasoning about the design and execution of research, or “Can you explain experimental methods, results, and conclusions?”

4. Data-based and statistical reasoning, or “Can you read, interpret, extrapolate, and draw conclusions from graphs, tables and figures?”

Tip #2: Know your definitions

Many questions within the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT will require an understanding of terminology commonly used in these fields. For example, you may come across a question about cognitive dissonance or hindsight bias. If you do not know the definitions of these words, you will not be able to answer the question correctly. After you study the relevant content for the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT, begin completing practice passages. As you practice, if you encounter an unknown term, add it to your “mistake log” or write the definition down on a flashcard. If you keep encountering the same term, and straight memorization is not working, try including an example or a diagram on your flashcard as well. Make sure the example makes sense to you, or this strategy will be ineffective. While you are aiming to get as much exposure to psychology and sociology topics as possible, it is impossible to study every term that you may need on test day. What should you do if you see a term on the MCAT for which you do not know the definition? If you find yourself in this situation, use context clues within the passage or question to try to determine the term’s meaning. This is another test-taking skill that is important to practice during your MCAT preparation.

Tip #3: Be ready for psychology and sociology data and experiments

The AAMC typically tests students on psychology and sociology experiments. This means that you cannot just practice vocabulary, you must be able to apply your knowledge to experiment-style questions. As you complete practice passages, get into the habit of determining the independent and dependent variable for the experiment, as well as necessary controls. When completing the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT, you should not spend too much time on a graph or figure, unless a question specifically asks about it. However, as you practice, you will want to sharpen your analysis skills in the event that you need them. What is the best way to ensure you get enough practice with these skills? Once you finish a practice passage, take some time to go back to any graphs or figures and review them to fully understand the information presented. This practice will ensure efficiency during the test day time crunch.

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Sample MCAT psychology and sociology questions

Give it a try! Below you will find several Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior sample questions to test your skills for this section of the MCAT:

Passage:

The illness experience shapes the way that people use health information. For patients with a rare health disorder, which is defined as a medical condition that affects fewer than 200,000 individuals living in the United States, online sources of information tend to be particularly important.

An example of a rare disorder is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as “Lou Gehrig’s disease.” ALS results from the progressive loss of motor nerves and affects about 1 out of 100,000 people. About 10% of people with ALS have a familial form of the condition, which is caused by an inherited genetic mutation. Aside from the familial form, the cause of ALS is largely unknown, though it is believed that the disorder results from both genetic and environmental factors.

Having a rare medical condition, such as ALS, can make it difficult to meet and interact with others who have the same rare disorder. Despite great distances, online communication provides a form of social interaction for those facing an uncommon health problem. Virtual peer networks provide vital social support for those who are affected by a rare disorder.

Research has found that women with rare disorders are more likely to access online support networks than men with rare disorders. Relationships formed through online support networks often become a meaningful part of a person’s identity. Individuals with rare disorders report that relating to others who have the same condition is often easier than trying to relate to friends or family members who do not share their condition.

Sample Questions:

1. Which statement best represents a threat to social identity? A young woman with a rare disorder:

A) believes that others treat her as less capable, and then she starts to see herself as deficient.

B) becomes discouraged when she hears that others with rare disorders are treated as less capable.

C) hides her disorder from others in order to project more confidence in social situations.

D) reveals her disorder to friends, who mistakenly assume that it is a social limitation.

2. Over the course of ten years, a rare disorder increases in prevalence such that it eventually affects more than 200,000 people in the United States. Based on the passage and this scenario, which prediction is most consistent with the sociological paradigm of symbolic interactionism?

A) As the number of affected individuals increases, government research funding increases.

B) Affected individuals are less likely to conceal their condition as it becomes less stigmatized.

C) As more people with the condition are treated, it receives less attention as a health concern.

D) Insurance coverage for the condition becomes more likely as more people require treatment.

3. Which research project best represents a macrosociological approach to studying the social support networks mentioned in the passage?

A)  A researcher follows the conversation of participants who post messages in an online support forum.

B)  A researcher interviews patients who participate in a local hospital’s support group for rare disorders.

C)  A researcher surveys patients for reasons that they joined an online support group for their disorder.

D)  A researcher tracks how the number of websites dedicated to rare disorders has changed over time.

Sample Discrete Questions

4. The concept of cultural capital predicts that

A) cultural distinctions associated with the young will be more valued within a society.

B) with improved communication, there will eventually be a convergence of cultural practices of all classes.

C) cultural distinctions by class will become less important during a recession because people will have less money to spend.

D) cultural distinctions associated with elite classes will be more valued within a society.

5. Researchers conducted an experiment to test social loafing. They asked participants to prepare an annual report or a tax return. Some participants performed the task individually and others performed it as a group. What are the independent and dependent variables?

A) The independent variable is the overall productivity of the group, and the dependent variable is each participant’s contribution to the task.

B) The independent variable is the type of task, and the dependent variable is whether the participants worked alone or in a group.

C) The independent variable is whether the participant worked alone or in a group, and the dependent variable is each participant’s contribution to the task.

D) The independent variable is whether the participant worked alone or in a group, and the dependent variable is the type of the task.

6. Which correlation supports the bystander effect?

A) The number of bystanders is positively correlated with the time it takes for someone to offer help in the case of an emergency.

B) The number of bystanders is negatively correlated with the time it takes for someone to offer help in the case of an emergency.

C) The number of bystanders is positively correlated with whether people judge a situation to be an emergency.

D) The number of bystanders is negatively correlated with whether people judge a situation to be an emergency.

Answers to sample questions

1. Which statement best represents a threat to social identity? A young woman with a rare disorder:

A) believes that others treat her as less capable, and then she starts to see herself as deficient.

B) becomes discouraged when she hears that others with rare disorders are treated as less capable.

C) hides her disorder from others in order to project more confidence in social situations.

D) reveals her disorder to friends, who mistakenly assume that it is a social limitation.

The correct answer is B.

Rationale: This psychology question assesses your knowledge of scientific concepts and the content category of self-identity. Social identity addresses the feelings that individuals derive from their membership in a group. Self-esteem can be challenged by threats to social identity, which is represented in option B. The incorrect options do not clearly identify the connection between an individual’s sense of self and their perceived belonging to a group.

2. Over the course of ten years, a rare disorder increases in prevalence such that it eventually affects more than 200,000 people in the United States. Based on the passage and this scenario, which prediction is most consistent with the sociological paradigm of symbolic interactionism?

A) As the number of affected individuals increases, government research funding increases.

B) Affected individuals are less likely to conceal their condition as it becomes less stigmatized.

C) As more people with the condition are treated, it receives less attention as a health concern.

D) Insurance coverage for the condition becomes more likely as more people require treatment.

The correct answer is B.

Rationale: This is a sociology question that evaluates your scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills. The question employs a theoretical paradigm related to social structure. Symbolic interactionism focuses on how meaning is constructed through one’s small-scale social interactions. This question is tied to social interactions, the illness experience, social stigma, and symbolic interactionism. The correct answer, option B, reasons from the viewpoint of symbolic interactionism to make a prediction about social interaction and stigmatization. The incorrect options make predictions about large-scale social changes or about the disease itself, which are not consistent with social interactionism.

3. Which research project best represents a macrosociological approach to studying the social support networks mentioned in the passage?

A)  A researcher follows the conversation of participants who post messages in an online support forum.

B)  A researcher interviews patients who participate in a local hospital’s support group for rare disorders.

C)  A researcher surveys patients for reasons that they joined an online support group for their disorder.

D)  A researcher tracks how the number of websites dedicated to rare disorders has changed over time.

The correct answer is D.

Rationale: This sociology question tests your reasoning of research design and execution in conjunction with your understanding of social structure. Macrosociology is a large-scale approach to sociology, which underscores the analysis of social systems at the structural level. Option D is the correct answer because tracking changes in websites provides data on the availability of information on rare disorders. This demonstrates a macrosociological approach because it allows the researcher to determine how a society’s organization of health information changes over time on a large-scale. The other options are incorrect because they are comparable to a microsociological approach and would result in data based on small-scale interactions or individual decisions.

4. The concept of cultural capital predicts that

A) cultural distinctions associated with the young will be more valued within a society.

B) with improved communication, there will eventually be a convergence of cultural practices of all classes.

C) cultural distinctions by class will become less important during a recession because people will have less money to spend.

D) cultural distinctions associated with elite classes will be more valued within a society.

The correct answer is D.

Rationale: This question assesses your knowledge of social inequality and requires you to make a prediction based on your understanding of cultural capital. To determine the correct answer, evaluate which prediction about social stratification is most consistent with cultural capital. The correct answer, option D, demonstrates this concept as it states the distinctions of the elite members in a stratified society will have the most value. The other options are incorrect because they do not correlate social assets with social standing.

5. Researchers conducted an experiment to test social loafing. They asked participants to prepare an annual report or a tax return. Some participants performed the task individually and others performed it as a group. What are the independent and dependent variables?

A) The independent variable is the overall productivity of the group, and the dependent variable is each participant’s contribution to the task.

B) The independent variable is the type of task, and the dependent variable is whether the participants worked alone or in a group.

C) The independent variable is whether the participant worked alone or in a group, and the dependent variable is each participant’s contribution to the task.

D) The independent variable is whether the participant worked alone or in a group, and the dependent variable is the type of the task.

The correct answer is C.

Rationale: This question assesses your knowledge of the social processes that influence human behavior. It requires you to reason about research design while understanding social loafing. Social loafing refers to the idea that people tend to exert less effort on a task when working in a group compared to the effort put forth when working alone. You are asked to draw inferences about the dependent and independent variables based on this social psychology concept and the description of the experimental design. The independent variable is changed in an experiment to test the effects on the dependent variable, which is measured throughout the experiment. The correct answer, option C, is the only option that correctly identifies each type of variable. Whether the participant worked alone or in a group is the independent variable that was altered for this experiment (to test the effect of social loafing) and the participant’s contribution to the annual tax return was then measured as the dependent variable.

6. Which correlation supports the bystander effect?

A) The number of bystanders is positively correlated with the time it takes for someone to offer help in the case of an emergency.

B) The number of bystanders is negatively correlated with the time it takes for someone to offer help in the case of an emergency.

C) The number of bystanders is positively correlated with whether people judge a situation to be an emergency.

D) The number of bystanders is negatively correlated with whether people judge a situation to be an emergency.

The correct answer is A.

Rationale: This question also tests your knowledge of how social processes influence human behavior, but requires you to engage in statistical reasoning. You must understand the distinction between negative and positive correlations and make a prediction about the data based on your knowledge of the bystander effect, the theory that individuals are less likely to offer help to a victim when there are other people present. In this case, option A is the only answer providing data to support this theory: the more people that are present, the more time it will take for help to be offered – a positive correlation in which both factors increase.

If you are studying for the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT, chances are you will want to practice for the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills, or CARS, section as well. Check out our tips for acing the CARS section and this MCAT CARS practice passage with questions and expert answers.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Why does the MCAT include the psychology and sociology section?

This fourth section of the MCAT was added to the exam in 2015. The MCAT is a comprehensive exam that evaluates diverse knowledge and skills. To be a successful physician, it is not sufficient to be knowledgeable only in the natural and physical sciences. Physicians need to know how to communicate with, and to serve, an increasingly diverse population. According to the AAMC, some of medicine’s most promising frontiers explore the realms of human behavior and social science in improving healthcare. In addition, basic and applied behavioral and social sciences provide foundational knowledge and advanced clinical applications essential for the skillful practice of medicine. The psychology and sociology section helps give admissions committees input about an applicant’s ability to consider their patients holistically and whether they understand how behavior impacts health. 

2. What if I encounter a very difficult passage within the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT?

Firstly, should you encounter a difficult passage on the test, try not to panic! Start by reading the passage to obtain a general understanding. Go through the passage one paragraph at a time, pausing after each paragraph to ask yourself what that paragraph was about. At the end of the passage, try to link each paragraph together into an overall understanding of the whole passage. Ask yourself, what is the main point, or central thesis, of the passage? Remember, wrong answers do not count against you; thus, for difficult passages and challenging questions, it is important to put your best foot forward and to answer every question, even if you need to make an educated guess.

3. What is a good score on the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT? How will I know I am ready to take the MCAT?

Asking this question means you are focusing on an ineffective MCAT study strategy. Focusing on a “good” score that will just get you into medical school is not advised. Instead, aim for the best score that you can achieve on each MCAT section to maximize your medical school options. Preparing for the MCAT is no small task and it can take months to adequately prepare. How can you gauge if you are ready to take the MCAT? Take a look at your diagnostic MCAT score and the scores you have been earning more recently on your full-length practice exams. Are you still improving, or have your scores plateaued? Continue to study as long as your MCAT scores continue to improve. If your MCAT score stabilizes, it is a good idea to take the exam, as long as your score range is acceptable to you. When you consistently score within your desired score range at least 3 times in a row, you can feel confident that you are ready to take the MCAT!

4. What was the mean score for the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT last cycle?

Last cycle’s matriculating medical school students earned a mean score of 128.5 on the Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior section of the MCAT, which translates to a percentile rank in the 83rd percentile. Therefore, on average, matriculating students earned a score on this section that was the same or better than 83% of all students. For a look at mean scores and percentile ranks for the other MCAT sections, take a look at our blog How Hard is the MCAT?. After you take the MCAT, determine the median MCAT scores for previous admissions cycles at your medical schools of interest; look at individual section scores as well as the median total score. As you build your school list, included several programs where your MCAT scores give you a reasonable chance of acceptance.

5. How can I minimize my stress on test day?

To minimize stress on the day of your MCAT, you must start well before the morning of your MCAT exam. In the week leading up to your MCAT, you should not take any more full-length practice exams. These exams are long and require a lot of focus, and you need to start saving your energy for the big day. You have dedicated a lot of hard work to studying up to this point, and now it is time to relax. Resist the temptation to spend the day before the exam frantically trying to review all of your notes or cramming last-minute information into your head: this is not an effective strategy to improve your score! Make sure you prepare everything for test day the night before, so you are not scrambling as you run out the door in the morning. On test day, be sure to take the optional breaks to give yourself some time to decompress in between MCAT sections. For more tips, check out our blog that helps you navigate MCAT stress to achieve your best score.

6. I am only having trouble with the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT and I am doing well on the rest of the sections. Does that matter?

Medical schools interpret your MCAT scores at their discretion. Some may put an emphasis on one section over the others, for example, CARS. However, generally, a balanced score is better than an imbalanced score. Therefore, it is important to aim to do equally well in every section. Why? Consistency across every section shows your ability to critically think and reason in many different content areas, and with different types of information, which is a valuable consideration for medical schools. You want to demonstrate that you can apply these skills to psychology and sociology content, not just to the natural and physical sciences. It is also important to remember that each section makes up ¼ of your overall MCAT score!

7. How can I strengthen my skills in reading, and interpreting graphs and figures within passages?

Getting involved in a research lab is a great way to strengthen your skills in reading and interpreting graphs for experiment-based passages. If you're going to be applying for research positions, have a look at our research assistant cover letter blog to help you maximize your chances of securing a position. Another option is to start a journal club with your friends that are also studying for the MCAT. Read a scientific article from a peer-reviewed journal each week, then meet to discuss your thoughts. Practice explaining graphs and figures out loud to the journal club, then ask club members if they understood your explanation.

8. Is there specific coursework that I should take to prepare for the psychology and sociology section of the MCAT?

All of the content on the MCAT is covered in introductory courses at most universities including first-semester psychology and sociology. It is important to take these introductory courses to help build your knowledge base and confidence in these areas before taking the MCAT. As a non-traditional medical school applicant, your coursework may not have included these typical medical school prerequisites. If you are in this boat, plan ahead and leave yourself enough time to complete a thorough study plan for the MCAT. You can study psychology and sociology content on your own, but you may also benefit from taking additional university courses or pursuing a postbaccalaureate program designed to get you up to speed with the knowledge base you will need for the MCAT. Also, be sure to take a look at the required prerequisite courses for each of the medical schools to which you're applying. Some schools will require that you have taken psychology and sociology before matriculating.

Conclusion

As an aspiring medical school student, it is important to appreciate that the Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior section of the MCAT reflects a changing medical field that is adapting to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population. The psychology and sociology section of the MCAT affords you the unique opportunity to demonstrate your understanding of the human and social aspects of medicine that will affect the wellbeing of your future patients. The MCAT is first and foremost a test of your critical thinking and reasoning skills. Dedicate adequate time to preparing for this section of the MCAT and you will be able to demonstrate to admissions committees that you are a well-rounded candidate who can successfully apply your critical reasoning skills to any topic that comes your way!

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AAMC MCAT Sample Question Guide