Medical School Early Assurance Programs

Traditionally, students applying to medical school are in their third or fourth year of undergrad studies, have completed many prerequisites for medical school, and have completed the MCAT. There are some recent developments, however, that increase the number of options available to highly successful undergraduates in applying to medical school. In particular, medical school Early Assurance Programs offer undergrads the opportunity to smoothly transition from undergraduate to med school studies and secure a spot in medical school earlier in their education.

This blog will help break down this method for expediting the process of transitioning from undergraduate studies to medical school and securing a spot in a competitive program, while also drawing attention to some of the pros and cons of Early Assurance Programs for medical school. Finally, we’ll give you a list of Early Assurance Programs in the U.S., with some general information to help you decide if further investigation of these programs is the right move for you.

What is an Early Assurance Program (EAP)?

An Early Assurance Program is a program that allows high-achieving undergraduates to apply and be accepted to medical school at the end of their second year or the beginning of their third year of undergrad, often prior to even taking the MCAT exam. Students who are ready to dedicate themselves to a career as a medical professional and who have demonstrated excellence in their coursework and community leadership by the end of their second year of university can apply to Early Assurance Programs and secure a seat in medical school well before graduation. Often, Early Assurance Program matriculants are able to bypass some of the traditional requirements for medical school, like the MCAT and applying and interviewing at multiple schools. This is intended to free up time for committed and high-achieving students to dedicate to their education, both in terms of focusing on their required courses and in exploring the broader range of knowledge through breadth courses and personal or professional development.

Requirements for Early Assurance Programs

The requirements for application vary from school to school, so you must look into the program(s) that interest you to see if you are eligible. However, in general, most Early Assurance Programs require you to have at least 5 pre-med courses completed by the end of your second year of undergrad. Some Early Assurance Programs require that you be selected for application by your pre-health advisor. As well, your overall academic performance during those first two years is critically important, so high overall and science GPAs are generally required. You’re trying to convince an admissions committee that you are prepared to commit to a life as a medical practitioner much earlier than many of your peers, so demonstrating that you have the stellar academic abilities and refined personal qualities necessary to make that commitment at such an early stage is paramount.

As well, you’ll have to go through a similar application process for med school, including submitting a medical school personal statement, medical school secondary essays (as applicable), letters of recommendation, demonstrating a thorough history of service through volunteer, work, and extra-curricular activities, and so on (note that some Early Assurance Programs accept applications through AMCAS, others require direct application through the institution). This means that, while you’re achieving academic excellence during those first two years of undergrad, you should also be gaining experience by shadowing a doctor, volunteering and community service, getting research and clinical experience, and so on.

The school may also require you to submit your high school transcripts and your SAT or ACT scores. Some Early Assurance Programs allow students to bypass the MCAT altogether, reasoning that student accepted to an EAP can then spend the time that would be typically spent preparing for the MCAT on exploring areas of interest and experiencing a more robust university experience as a result. Relieving the pressure that comes with applying to, and interviewing at, multiple medical schools and preparing for and taking the MCAT, allows students to make the most out of their time as undergraduates, exploring the world of intellectual inquiry prior to specializing in medical school.

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Eligibility for medical school Early Assurance Programs can also depend on the policy of the school in question. Some medical schools will only open EAPs to students at their own school, or those coming from programs linked to that school. There are schools that will accept applicants from any university, and a list of EAP schools and their policies will be provided later in this post.

If you are accepted to an Early Assurance Program for medical school, note that this doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re signing a contract stating that you will attend the school that accepts you (do note that some schools will require such a binding agreement, so – again – ensure you’ve checked the specific policy of the school and program to which you’re applying). Generally, for those schools that don’t require a binding agreement, you’ll have until the beginning of your senior year of undergrad to determine whether or not you want to remain with that program or apply elsewhere.

If you do decide to apply elsewhere, you will have to go through the standard application process – receiving admission offers through an Early Assurance Program in no way guarantees that you’ll be accepted elsewhere, and such acceptance won’t really impact your application to other schools (positively or negatively). As well, if you apply to an Early Assurance Program at your school and are not accepted, you are still able to apply through the standard application process, and your lack of acceptance to the EAP will not negatively impact your application.

Obviously, Early Assurance Programs are highly competitive. The number of students accepted through EAPs varies widely from school-to-school, with some accepting up to half of a year’s class through EAPs, and others accepting a mere handful of students through such programs. As well, some schools will require a specific curriculum following acceptance through an EAP, including summer enrichment programs or mandatory research projects.

Pros and Cons of Early Assurance Programs for Medical School

As with any potential decision, there are pros and cons to applying to an EAP. Here are some things to take into consideration, if you’re thinking about applying to a medical school Early Assurance Program.

Pros:

  • Peace of mind: If you are a successful EAP applicant, then you will be guaranteed a seat in the medical school to which you’ve been accepted. Stress and concerns over applications, interviews, and admissions are gone, as you know you’ll have secured a seat in medical school.
  • Saving time and money: If you are accepted, you don’t have to spend the time and money needed to apply to multiple medical schools and interview later in your education. If you apply to an Early Assurance Program that doesn’t require the MCAT, that also saves you money and preparation time.
  • MCAT: Some EAPs do not require an MCAT score as part of your application.
    • Depending on the specifics of the Early Assurance Program to which you are applying, you may not have to take the MCAT at all.
    • Note that not all EAPs allow students to skip the MCAT entirely, though, so you must confirm MCAT policy with any EAPs to which you might apply. Even those that do not require MCAT scores at the time of application may require you to take the MCAT later in your studies and may have a minimum required MCAT score to advance into medical school.
  • GPA: If accepted, some of the pressure to maintain a near-perfect GPA throughout all four years of undergrad may be relieved. While you must maintain excellent grades, your grades at the time of applying to the EAP are most critical.
    • You must check with any EAPs to which you’re considering applying to see if they have a policy around the minimum GPA students must maintain in their third and fourth years of undergrad. Some offers of acceptance to EAPs are conditional on the student’s continued academic excellence throughout their undergraduate education, and some have very specific minimum GPA requirements for your junior and senior years.
  • Freedom: With less pressure around maintaining that near-perfect GPA, you may have more freedom in terms of the non-pre-req courses you take. Along with your required courses, you can take classes that genuinely interest you, without having to worry as much about your marks (i.e., some interesting breadth courses are often avoided, for fear of not doing well and harming the overall GPA).
    • As well, this would allow you to consider various extracurricular, volunteer, or service activities that may have been passed up previously, due to the pressure these put on already-tight time constraints.
  • Impact on later applications: If you apply to an Early Assurance Program and are not accepted, this will not impact later applications and doesn’t prevent you from applying through the more traditional route later in your education (including to the school where your application for an EAP was unsuccessful). In fact, reflecting on an unsuccessful application may help you gain insights into those areas that need improvement before applying to med school.

Cons:

  • Transition from high school to undergraduate education: If you haven’t yet started university, then you may not know just how challenging the first two years of undergrad can be (and, if you’re in your first or second year of undergraduate studies now, then you likely know all too well what a challenge it is!). The difference in expectations between high school and undergrad cannot be overstated – even if you’ve been taking college prep courses, this isn’t the same as being enrolled in a full-time undergraduate program. Many students – even academically strong students – struggle with the transition from high school to undergrad, both in terms of the academic expectations (particularly the need for self-directed learning) and in terms of the overall workload and demands placed on your time. As such, many students may find it difficult to balance the demands of school and the need to devote time to participating in volunteer and community service work, shadowing a doctor, doing clinical work, engaging in extra-curriculars, and completing all the other requirements or recommended activities that must be part of your application, if you’re going to stand out as an Early Assurance Program applicant.
    • Remember, your first- and second-year marks must be truly excellent to even be considered for an EAP, but you must also demonstrate your commitment to a future as a medical professional. Spending too much time demonstrating that commitment could impact your grades; spending too much time ensuring your grades are near-perfect could cut into the amount of time needed to take on those other responsibilities. More and more students enter university needing to work part-time, or even full-time, to support their studies, and such students will be even more impacted by such requirements. Learning to balance your time here is key.
Follow this link to learn more about how many volunteer hours for medical school are needed to put together a competitive application!
 
  • Stage of life: On top of being a time for developing skills and refining knowledge, university is also a time of self-discovery. You’re learning so much about yourself and the world around you, asking new questions and exploring aspects of our shared world that you’ve likely never even considered before. As such, it is not uncommon for students to end up studying something quite different than they thought they would when they first enrolled in university (I, for one, changed my major entirely about halfway through my third year – and then went on to get an MA and PhD in that field!). As such, it’s a pretty early stage in your life to begin committing to a future career.
    • Of course, as noted earlier, you’re not necessarily entering into a binding contract if you are accepted to an EAP, and you are allowed to ultimately decline the offer (you usually have until sometime senior year to make a final decision), but it can still feel as though you’ve committed, which could make a change of heart about your area of study difficult to implement.
    • As well, being accepted to an Early Assurance Program would likely increase expectations, and thus social pressure, among family, friends, and others invested in your success, and that kind of social pressure shouldn’t be disregarded. A change in major or focus after acceptance to an EAP could lead to feeling like you’ve let others down, which can compromise the sense of freedom addressed in the pros, above.
  • MCAT: Being able to potentially skip the MCAT is likely a huge pro for many reading this. This exam is long, notoriously difficult, and brings with it a lot of stress and anxiety. However, if you apply and are accepted to an Early Assurance Program that doesn’t require the MCAT, and you therefore skip it or don’t spend sufficient time studying for it, you could be at a disadvantage if you decide later that you want to apply to other med schools.
  • GPA: Similarly, as there is a bit less pressure to maintain a near-perfect GPA in your third and fourth years of undergrad, that could lead to your GPA slipping a bit, if you don’t prioritize it among all your other responsibilities. If that happens and you let your grades slip during your third and fourth years of undergrad, and you ultimately decide to apply to other med schools, you could be at a disadvantage.

Medical Schools with Early Assurance Programs

Note that the information below is meant to be a general guide only. As this information changes frequently, it is imperative that you verify any and all information with the school to which you are considering applying. Additionally, please note that this list may not be exhaustive, as new programs are frequently implemented, and existing programs are sometimes removed.

Albany Medical College Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility includes Amherst College, Bowdoin College, College of the Holy Cross, Hamilton College, Haverford college, Middlebury College, State University of New York at Albany, Swarthmore College and Williams College.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA, 3.5, at time of application and to be maintained throughout undergrad.
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: Accepted students must identify a significant healthcare-related project to pursue during third- and fourth-year. 
    • Students must complete minimum of 2 of 4 required science courses (biology, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics) by the end of sophomore year. 
    • Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools.
  • Due date (if available): Mid-June

Boston University Early Medical School Selection Program

  • Enrollment policy: Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Written agreements exist with: Chaminade University, Clark-Atlanta University, Dillard University, Hampton University, Morehouse College, Morgan State University, North Carolina Central University, Spelman College, Tougaloo College, University of the Incarnate Word, University of Texas at El Paso, University of the Virgin Islands, Virginia Union University
  • GPA requirements: Not stated
  • MCAT required: Yes, no minimum requirement stated
  • Other notes or restrictions: Program emphasis is on underrepresented minorities. 
    • Students are required to complete at least 1 year of biology, with lab, and 1 year of chemistry, with lab, at minimum. 
    • Students accepted to this EAP will remain at their undergraduate school through junior year, spending summers taking courses at BU. They will then go to BU during their senior year, where they will live in campus residence.
  • Due date (if available): Not stated

Brody School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: East Carolina University Honors College applicants who are legal residents of North Carolina. Eligibility also includes the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, and the North Carolina Honors College.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA, 3.5
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: EAP students are advised to complete all pre-med requirements by the end of sophomore year. As well, students are required to take 9 credit hours of course in humanities, social sciences, and/or fine arts, participate in groups and enrichment activities in each year of undergraduate studies, and maintain eligibility for the Honors College throughout their four years of study.
  • Due date (if available): Not specified

Dartmouth University Geisel School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility includes Middlebury College and Dartmouth College students.
  • GPA requirements: Not stated. The medians for previously matriculated students at the Geisel SOM are: Overall GPA, 3.69; Science GPA, 3.64
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools.
  • Due date (if available): Early October

Drexel University College of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility includes Alleghany College after freshman year and Drexel University in junior year. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and must have a diploma from a U.S. high school.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.6; Science GPA, 3.6. No grades lower than C are permitted (including C-).
  • MCAT required: Yes, minimum 513, with no subsection score below 127, or a subsection score of 128 or higher in all sections except CARS, where a 127 score is acceptable.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools. Students who wish to apply to other med schools must relinquish their provisional acceptance to Drexel’s EAP.
    • This is a BA/BS+MD Early Assurance Program, where students pursue a combined degree program that also offers provisional early acceptance to the medicine program. Selection takes place in the senior year of high school.
    • Candidates must rank in the top 10% of their class and have an ACT score of 31 or higher, or a combined SAT score of 1360 (on the “old” SAT) or a 1420 (on the “new” SAT).
  • Due date (if available): Early November – the application date is the same as the application date for undergraduate study at Drexel, as this is a combined program.

Georgetown University School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Georgetown undergraduates only; transfer students are not eligible to apply.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.6; Science GPA, 3.6. Earning a C or below in any course results in disqualification.
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: Must be in fourth semester at Georgetown and completed 4 of 5 pre-med courses by the end of May (one of the four completed courses must be Organic Chemistry).
    • Cannot withdraw from any course related to major.
    • Changes to proposal (submitted as part of the application) or coursework plans must be pre-approved by School of Medicine.
  • Due date (if available): Pre-application interviews and related preparations usually begin in November, with the finalized application package due in late-March.

Hofstra/Northwell Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine, Zucker Pipeline Program

  • Enrollment policy: Students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. This program is intended to bring in students from groups historically underrepresented in medicine and economically disadvantaged students.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.2; Science GPA not specified. Students ranking in the top 10% of their high school class will receive strong consideration.
  • MCAT required: Yes, no minimum recommended score noted.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Admitted students will receive a $1,750 annual stipend.
    • This is a 3-year, summer intensive program for academically excellent students interested in a career as a medical professional. Upon completion of the 3-year program, students will be directly matriculated into the medical school.
    • Students must have a composite score of 1200 or higher on the SAT, or a score of 25 or higher on the ACT.
    • To advance to the second year of this program, students must maintain a 3.3 GPA; to advance to the third year, a 3.5 GPA is required.
  • Due date (if available): Early April, though priority is given to students who apply by March 1.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Flex Med Program

  • Enrollment policy: No restrictions. International students can apply if they are enrolled at a US or Canadian school.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA. Students are expected to maintain a 3.5 GPA and achieve a B or higher in all required courses.
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: Applicants must have completed two semesters of college Biology, two semesters of college Chemistry, or two semesters of college Physics prior to January 15 of their application year.
    • Students will be encouraged to gain proficiency in a language other than English, with special emphasis on Spanish or Mandarin.
    • Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools. Once accepted, students will have to withdraw from Icahn if they wish to apply to other medical schools.
    • Students with a combined SAT score of 1350 are considered competitive, but the review of applications is holistic and students with a lower SAT score than this are welcome to apply.
  • Due date (if available): Mid-February

Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility includes Alma College, Aquinas College, Calvin College, Grand Rapids Community College/Grand Valley State University, Grand Valley State University, Hope College, Kettering University, Lake Superior State University, Michigan Technological University, Northern Michigan University, Saginaw Valley State University, and the University of Michigan-Flint.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.0; Science GPA, 3.0. Minimum 2.0 for all pre-med courses.
  • MCAT required: Yes, minimum score of 500, with minimum sub-section scores of 125
  • Other restrictions: Prioritizes those who plan to practice in an underserved region or with an underserved population.
    • Preference is given to those who are first-generation college students, who graduated from a low-income high school, who are eligible for needs-based grants, and/or who express particular interest in a high-need medical specialization.
  • Due date (if available): Not stated

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: None stated
  • GPA requirements: Specific requirements are not stated, but students are encouraged to look at the incoming class profile. Per this, median GPA is 3.89, median Science GPA is 3.88.
  • MCAT required: Yes. Specific score requirements are not stated, but students are encouraged to look at the incoming class profile. Per this, median MCAT score is 519.
  • Other notes or restrictions: To be eligible, students must apply only to the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as their first choice school and must matriculate to Feinberg if accepted. Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools.
  • Due date (if available): Interested students should notify the Office of Admissions of their intention to apply prior to June 15 of the application year in which they hope to matriculate. Applications are due in early August.

Penn State College of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility includes Eberly College of Science.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.6 at the time of application (Science GPA not stated). Students must maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher, after acceptance.
  • MCAT required: Yes. No specific score required, but applicants should perform at or above the mean score, as compared to the previous entering class. Mean score of previous matriculants was 510.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Applicants must have an SAT score of 1300 or higher.
    • As well, students must complete 8 of 10 required math and science courses prior to application.
  • Due date (if available): Early March

SUNY Upstate Medical University Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: No restrictions. Applicants must be sophomores enrolled at any accredited undergraduate school.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA, 3.5. Students must maintain this GPA in each semester (decimals are not rounded up), and no grade for a course can be lower than a C.
  • MCAT required: Yes. Recommended score is 510, and a maximum of 2 attempts are permitted to reach this score.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Students who accept admission into the EAP are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools.
    • Applicants must have a combined SAT score of 1360 or higher, or an ACT score of 30 Composite or higher.
    • As well, students must have completed 5 of 8 requires science courses.
  • Due date (if available): Early July

Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility includes Temple University, Washington & Jefferson College, DeSales University, Lehigh University, Moravian College, Muhlenberg College.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA, 3.5 at the end of junior year. No grade can be below a B-.
  • MCAT required: Yes, minimum score of 508, with no section score lower than 126.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Students interested in linking through the EAP are nominated by undergrad pre-med advisors.
    • Students must complete 2 semesters of chemistry, organic chemistry, and biology for consideration; by the end of junior year, students must have completed 2 semesters in biology, 4 in chemistry, 2 in physics, and 2 in mathematics.
    • Students must also complete 50 hours of physician shadowing or related experiences and 50 hours of community service.
    • Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools.
  • Due date (if available): Not stated

Tufts University School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Only Tufts University sophomores are eligible.
    • Maine Track at Tufts: Students who are sophomores at Bates College, Bowdoin College, Colby College, and all University of Maine campuses are eligible to apply. This program is for legal residents of Maine or have strong ties to Maine who plan to pursue a career practicing rural medicine.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA, 3.5. Must score minimum B+ in all courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics (including labs); must score minimum B in all other courses.
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: By the time of application, students must have completed at least 2 semesters of biology, 2 semesters of general chemistry, and 1 semester of organic chemistry. Three of these courses must be completed by the end of fall semester in sophomore year. AP credit will not count toward these courses, and all courses must be completed at Tufts.
    • Competitive applicants generally have a combined SAT score of 1300 or higher, or an ACT Composite score above 30.
  • Due date (if available): February 1

University at Buffalo SUNY Jacobs School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: University at Buffalo, SUNY Buffalo State, D’Youville College, Canisius College, Tougaloo College. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.
    • As well, students must be historically underrepresented in the field of medicine.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA, 3.5. 3.5 GPA must be maintained in each semester.
  • MCAT required: Yes. No specified requirement, but the median score of previous matriculants is 510.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Applicants should have a combined SAT score of 1400 or higher.
    • To be considered, students must apply only to the University of Buffalo through AMCAS, and must attend UB if accepted.
  • Due date (if available): Mid-February

University of Chicago Loyola Stritch School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Full-time Loyola undergraduate students only
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.6; Science GPA, 3.6, with no grade lower than a C in the student’s academic record.
  • MCAT required: Minimum 509 composite score, or a confidence band that includes 509 within its range. There is no minimum section requirement.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Preference given to students who haven’t withdrawn from or repeated courses.
    • Applicants must complete general and organic chemistry, as well as biology or physics and a pre-calculus or higher math course, by the time of application.
    • Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools.
  • Due date (if available): Varies – usually late August.

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine R.O.S.E Program (Research, Observation, Service, Education):

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility is for Ohio residents and certain Indiana or Kentucky counties with Ohio reciprocity; students may attend college anywhere in the U.S., as long as they are residents of Ohio or certain Indiana or Kentucky counties.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.40; Science GPA, 3.45.
  • MCAT required: Yes, minimum score of approximately 508
  • Other notes or restrictions: If accepted, students commit to spending two summers conducting research at the University of Cincinnati COM.
    • Students must have completed a full year of biology and general chemistry (with labs), and at least one term of organic chemistry by the time of application.
  • Due date (if available): Early February

University of Florida Medical Honors Program

  • Enrollment policy: Program is open to both residents and non-residents of Florida. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.
  •  GPA requirements: Overall GPA: not stated; Science GPA: 3.7
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: This is an accelerated 7-year BS/MD program for students who have demonstrated academic excellence during their freshmen and sophomore years of university.
    • Applicants must have completed biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry (with labs for all three), prior to application.
    • Demonstrated commitment to volunteering and community service are also required.
    • As well, foreign language proficiency is required for applicants to this program.
  • Due date (if available): Mid-February

University of Rochester School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Eligibility includes Amherst College, Bowdoin College, Carleton College, Colgate University, CUNY Hunter, Hamilton College, Haverford College, Middlebury College, Swarthmore College, Williams College, Xavier University of Louisiana. Students apply in May-June following sophomore year.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5 or higher. 3.5+ GPA must be maintained through junior and senior years.
  • MCAT required: No. Students are also not required to submit SAT or ACT scores for admission in the EAP.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Has an optional summer research program where student work with a research mentor.
    • Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools. Applying elsewhere results in forfeiture of conditional acceptance to University of Rochester EAP.
  • Due date (if available): Applications accepted from early May to the end of June

University of Toledo College of Medicine MedStart Program

  • Enrollment policy: Applicants must be at the beginning of their junior year of undergrad studies at an accredited U.S. college or university.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.7; Science GPA, 3.5
  • MCAT required: No
  • Other notes or restrictions: Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools. Submission of an AMCAS application to another med school will be considered a withdrawal from the MedStart program.
    • Applicants should have a minimum of one year of general chemistry (with lab), one year of organic chemistry (with lab), one year of biology or one year of physics.
    • Applicants a recommended to have an ACT score of 30 or higher, or an SAT score of 1980 or higher.
  • Due date (if available): Late-September

Wake Forest School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

  • Enrollment policy: Wake Forest undergraduates only
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.5; Science GPA, 3.5
  • MCAT required: Yes, score of 509 or higher; EAP acceptance is conditional upon completing the MCAT with 509 or higher prior to matriculation.
  • Other notes or restrictions: Accepting an offer to this program is binding, and students are expected to refrain from applying to, or accepting offers from, other medical schools.
  • Due date (if available): Mid-October

Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine:

  • Enrollment policy: Must be an Ohio resident. Eligibility includes Central State University, the University of Dayton, Wilberforce University, and Wright State University.
  • GPA requirements: Overall GPA, 3.4; Science GPA, 3.4 at time of application. Overall quarterly GPA must be 3.2 or higher after acceptance.
  • MCAT required: Yes
  • Other notes or restrictions: Applicants must have an ACT score of 28 or higher, or an SAT score of 1300 or higher.
    • Students should complete general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biology prior to applying.
  • Due date (if available): Early May

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