Need a nursing school application cover letter example? Look no further. Nursing school applications can be tough and writing a formal cover letter requires a bit of guidance. Nursing school application cover letters can be a great way to emphasize your professional work experience or volunteer work as you apply for nursing school. But unlike a personal statement, cover letters are bit more structured and formal writing. Nursing admissions consulting services can certainly help coach students on writing cover letters but reading nursing school application cover letter examples is a good place to start, too! In this blog, we’ll look at what a nursing school cover letter is and how to write a strong cover letter. At the bottom, we’ve also included some samples of nursing cover letters.


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What is a nursing school application cover letter?

A nursing school application cover letter works almost the same as a cover letter for any job application. For prospective nursing school students, a cover letter is the introduction to your application package, and a way of introducing yourself on paper to the admissions committee of a school. It is similar to a nursing school letter of intent or nursing school personal statement, but there are some key differences.

Firstly, a cover letter is typically shorter and more formal than a personal statement. It also tends to focus on your professional work experience, volunteer experience and skillset. A nursing school cover letter is designed to demonstrate why you are a good fit for a nursing program and how you will be an excellent future medical professional. A letter of intent or personal statement usually examines your personal motivations, experiences and reasons for wanting to become a nurse. It’s your way of answering the question ‘why do you want to be a nurse?’.

Nursing schools do not usually require applicants to submit a cover letter, although depending on the school or program they may ask. Schools typically have a preference between personal statements or letters of intent and cover letters, but it is always an option to submit a cover letter.

Cover letters can be excellent additions to your nursing school application, particularly alongside a nursing school application resume. A good cover letter will bolster your resume, expand on your most significant work or volunteer experiences and provide context for the admissions committee on who you are and what desirable skills you have. Just like a job application, a nursing cover letter can help secure you a nursing school admissions interview. Writing a cover letter is also good practice for forming your answers to nursing school interview questions.

How to structure a cover letter for nursing school

A nursing school application cover letter is a formal letter, typically no more than one page long. Or about 200-400 words maximum. Since the word count is low, you’ll need to be fairly concise and get to your point. You’ll also need to limit yourself to only a few points and keep things relevant. Like other formal letters, such as letters of intent, they include several important sections, which we’ve outlined below.

Remember to keep your tone polite and formal. A cover letter is a brief and concise document, so get straight to the point and only include the most important details. Think of the cover letter as an introduction to your entire application package. It’s a way to lead the admissions committee into who you are and what you have to offer, before taking an in-depth look at your personal, educational and professional history in the bulk of the application.

The purpose of the cover letter is to “pitch yourself” to the admissions committee. We’ll look at how to write a strong nursing school application cover letter next.

Preparing for your nursing school interview? Check out this video!

How to write a good nursing school cover letter

Writing a good cover letter means convincing the admissions committee that you are a prime candidate or a nursing program and to give you a chance to interview with them. To do so, you want to provide evidence of your candidacy by sharing key experiences or skills you have. Then align those experiences to the nursing school’s program values. The cover letter allows you an opportunity to highlight the most important sections of your application package and demonstrate how you will become an excellent future nursing professional. There are many different kinds of experiences you can emphasize in your cover letter, even if you don’t have much work experience in health care or related jobs. Read some physician cover letter examples or MBA cover letter examples to get a better idea of what kind of experiences to include. You can also look at some ERAS experience section examples to see what kind of professional and personal experiences admissions committees like to see.

Next we’ll look at what kind of experiences to include in your nursing school cover letter—and what to leave out!

What not to include

Your cover letter is relatively short, so avoid using too many details or launching into extensive personal anecdotes or stories. Avoid getting lost in the weeds or using irrelevant examples. Be sure to show why your chosen examples are relevant to the nursing school’s values or the nursing profession. It’s also important not to repeat too much information from your resume or other parts of your application. Elaborate and expand, but don’t just rehash old information.

Nursing school cover letter examples

Here we’ve included some samples of nursing school cover letters for your reference. Use these examples to help you write your own cover letter for nursing school!

Sample #1

Dear Director Higgins,

I am writing today as part of my application to your program at [Nursing School]. I am a recent graduate of [Pre-med university] and I am excited to take this next step in becoming a nursing professional. In my application you will see that I exceed the stated qualifications for your program intake, but first allow me to share with you why I believe I will be an excellent nursing student.

Throughout my undergraduate years, I have worked as a server at a family restaurant. In my years of working there, I have cultivated many desirable soft skills that make a good professional nurse, such as strong communication skills, diplomacy and conflict management. In interacting with the customers and other staff, I have developed an ease in managing all kinds of different individuals. Working alongside a restaurant team has also been very rewarding for my personal skill development, as it is a fast-paced and sometimes chaotic environment. It is challenging, but strong teamwork and collaboration is essential, and I have learned effective ways to work as part of the team.

I am also proud to have some experience in caring for patients. Although I have not had the opportunity to provide for human patients, I volunteer my free hours at an animal shelter, helping to care for sick animals, do routine cleaning and medication administration. I am consistently recognized for my strong work ethic, my compassion for the animals we help and my steady hands when helping the staff vet administer injectable medications. I have found working with these animals to be incredibly rewarding, and I look forward to an opportunity to work with human patients as a professional nurse.

I believe my experiences have give me a solid introduction to the work of a nurse, and I am excited to continue my education in health care. I will be an enthusiastic student in the classroom and no doubt an excellent example of the kind of nurse [Nursing School] can produce. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions regarding my application. I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,

Sanjay Deepa

 Writing a letter of intent instead? Read this infographic.

Sample #2

Dear Admissions Committee,

I am writing this letter to share my qualifications for admission at [Nursing School] in this application cycle. I am a graduate of [University] and I have dedicated myself to gaining the needed experience in healthcare for the past several summers. My goal is to enter a career as a nurse in a women’s health centre or health clinic.

In pursuit of this goal, I have been gaining shadowing experience with several nurses at the [Name] Women’s Health Clinic in [City]. It was important to me to have multiple shadowing experiences so I could get some insight into my future career from actual practicing nurses and see firsthand what treating patients was like. I have found these experiences incredibly rewarding, as I have been able to assist with patients and earn valuable experience interacting with them in a clinical setting. Shadowing has shown me what I can realistically expect from a career in women’s health, and it has solidified my decision to enter this field of medicine. I have also been fortunate to meet a team of dedicated and talented nurses who have shared with me their insights on working in women’s health. Their advice and guidance on my burgeoning clinical skills has been a valuable teaching experience for me. Several of these nurses have also agreed to write letters of recommendation for me which you will find in my application package.

My shadowing experiences have given me a solid foundation of nursing and I am looking forward to starting my journey to becoming a women’s health care nurse. Please feel free to contact me at the email address or phone number on my application. I look forward to enrolling in the fall semester.

Kind Regards,

Alexandra Clopin

FAQs

1. How do I write a cover letter for a nursing school?

To write a cover letter for nursing school, use a formal letter format with the addressee’s name and title, an introduction, body and conclusion, followed by a formal salutation and closing. You should also include your contact information and details. 

2. Should I write a cover letter for nursing school?

While a cover letter for nursing school is not always required, it can be a good idea to include one anyways. A good cover letter can help your application by providing some context or expanding on the information in your application.

3. How do I write a strong cover letter for nursing school?

To write a strong cover letter for nursing school, include the best and most meaningful of your professional or volunteer work experiences. Highlight the skills and abilities you have that relate to the nursing profession and provide clear, relevant examples.

4. What structure do I use for a cover letter?

Cover letters use a formal letter structure, as well as the familiar introduction, body and conclusion for the main sections of the letter. 

5. What should a cover letter include?

A nursing school cover letter might include examples of your work experience, any skills, achievements or certifications you have that relate to your ability to become a good nursing professional, or how your personal values and commitment align with the nursing school’s mission and values. 

6. Is a cover letter required for a nursing school application?

No, a cover letter is not always a requirement for nursing school applications. Some nursing programs may ask for one, or they may state it as an optional part of your application. 

7. How do you begin a cover letter for nursing school?

Begin a cover letter for nursing school with a “Dear [Name and Title]. Try to address your letter to a specific person. If you’re not sure who will be reading the letter, use “Dear Admissions Committee” or similar. Avoid using “To Whom it May Concern.”

8. What does it mean to “pitch yourself” or “sell yourself” in a cover letter?

Cover letters are used to “pitch yourself” and secure an interview opportunity. They are an admission committee’s first impression of who you are and what you bring to the table. To pitch yourself in a cover letter means convincing the admissions committee that you have the experience, drive and skills to succeed in a nursing program. Essentially, you sell them on the idea that you are a prime candidate.

To your success,

Your friends at BeMo

BeMo Academic Consulting


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