As a first-generation Canadian, I am the product of a multi-lingual, multi-cultural, multi-religious family. With a Buddhist, Thai mother and a Hindu, Indian father, my childhood was full of discussion, active debate and compromise as we worked through our differing thoughts and opinions. I learned from a young age to be proud of my background and to respect, appreciate and understand contrasting perspectives and differing world-views.

From a young age, I was taught to advocate for vulnerable individuals. I remember canvassing door-to-door with my mother for the Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF). This became a yearly tradition and it felt good to be making a small contribution to a good cause. My mother instilled in me the importance of helping others as we progress through life, and experiences like these gave me a strong belief in community and advocacy.

While studying social science at Albany University, I wrote about issues faced by new refugees settling in the US in the school newspaper. During my research, I learned that many families fled without having a chance to pack any of their required belongings. Determined to help, I decided to start a clothing drive for refugees and asked for donations in my column. I was shocked to see the level of contribution and overwhelmed with how many people were willing to give up their personal items to support those in need. Thanks to the help of the Albany student body, I delivered boxes of clothes to the local refugee organization. I witnessed a volunteer handing out clothing to a young family with two children. Seeing their smiles and gratitude as they tried on the new outfits left me joyful and deeply satisfied. I felt proud that so many of us had contributed to making a real difference in our community. Many people had learned of the clothing drive through the school newspaper column and I realized the importance my voice could play in bringing positive change.

With this new impetus, I began volunteering at the University's radio station. Here I had the privilege of hosting a weekly talk show. I used my voice to educate others on serious issues such as homelessness and drug abuse in our community and to lean on others for support in achieving goals. I felt proud to have initiated many successful fundraisers, food, and clothing drives to support underserved community members, but I wanted to do more. I was compelled to learn about how the law could provide support and justice for these disadvantaged groups.

With a fuelling passion to learn, I secured a summer position working as an entry-level legal assistant at a family law firm. In addition to managing case files and helping to prepare legal documents, I had the opportunity to assist lawyers and paralegals in court and at tribunals. I witnessed how strong evidence demonstrated in case law could provide justice and I was fascinated by the passion that drove lawyers to meticulously prepare for cases while building trust and connections with their clients. I quickly understood their dedication as I realized they believed in what they were fighting for, and they too wanted to help those who needed it most.

My experiences have shown me the impact a small contribution can make in bettering the lives of those in need. I want to continue using my voice to invoke positive change and will allow my family cultural experiences to guide me in connecting with those with diverse values, beliefs, and feelings. As a lawyer, I will strive to address issues in the legal system, communicate compassionately, debate respectfully, and bring service and justice to all different types of people in my community.

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As a first-generation Canadian, I am the product of a multi-lingual, multi-cultural, multi-religious family. With a Buddhist, Thai mother and a Hindu, Indian father, my childhood was full of discussion, active debate and compromise as we worked through our differing thoughts and opinions. I learned from a young age to be proud of my background and to respect, appreciate and understand contrasting perspectives and differing world-views.

From a young age, I was taught to advocate for vulnerable individuals. I remember canvassing door-to-door with my mother for the Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF). This became a yearly tradition and it felt good to be making a small contribution to a good cause. My mother instilled in me the importance of helping others as we progress through life, and experiences like these gave me a strong belief in community and advocacy.

While studying social science at Albany University, I wrote about issues faced by new refugees settling in the US in the school newspaper. During my research, I learned that many families fled without having a chance to pack any of their required belongings. Determined to help, I decided to start a clothing drive for refugees and asked for donations in my column. I was shocked to see the level of contribution and overwhelmed with how many people were willing to give up their personal items to support those in need. Thanks to the help of the Albany student body, I delivered boxes of clothes to the local refugee organization. I witnessed a volunteer handing out clothing to a young family with two children. Seeing their smiles and gratitude as they tried on the new outfits left me joyful and deeply satisfied. I felt proud that so many of us had contributed to making a real difference in our community. Many people had learned of the clothing drive through the school newspaper column and I realized the importance my voice could play in bringing positive change.

With this new impetus, I began volunteering at the University's radio station. Here I had the privilege of hosting a weekly talk show. I used my voice to educate others on serious issues such as homelessness and drug abuse in our community and to lean on others for support in achieving goals. I felt proud to have initiated many successful fundraisers, food, and clothing drives to support underserved community members, but I wanted to do more. I was compelled to learn about how the law could provide support and justice for these disadvantaged groups.

With a fuelling passion to learn, I secured a summer position working as an entry-level legal assistant at a family law firm. In addition to managing case files and helping to prepare legal documents, I had the opportunity to assist lawyers and paralegals in court and at tribunals. I witnessed how strong evidence demonstrated in case law could provide justice and I was fascinated by the passion that drove lawyers to meticulously prepare for cases while building trust and connections with their clients. I quickly understood their dedication as I realized they believed in what they were fighting for, and they too wanted to help those who needed it most.

My experiences have shown me the impact a small contribution can make in bettering the lives of those in need. I want to continue using my voice to invoke positive change and will allow my family cultural experiences to guide me in connecting with those with diverse values, beliefs, and feelings. As a lawyer, I will strive to address issues in the legal system, communicate compassionately, debate respectfully, and bring service and justice to all different types of people in my community.

Click to go back to law school personal statement examples.

If you’d rather seek our help for application review click here.

As a first-generation Canadian, I am the product of a multi-lingual, multi-cultural, multi-religious family. With a Buddhist, Thai mother and a Hindu, Indian father, my childhood was full of discussion, active debate and compromise as we worked through our differing thoughts and opinions. I learned from a young age to be proud of my background and to respect, appreciate and understand contrasting perspectives and differing world-views.

From a young age, I was taught to advocate for vulnerable individuals. I remember canvassing door-to-door with my mother for the Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF). This became a yearly tradition and it felt good to be making a small contribution to a good cause. My mother instilled in me the importance of helping others as we progress through life, and experiences like these gave me a strong belief in community and advocacy.

While studying social science at Albany University, I wrote about issues faced by new refugees settling in the US in the school newspaper. During my research, I learned that many families fled without having a chance to pack any of their required belongings. Determined to help, I decided to start a clothing drive for refugees and asked for donations in my column. I was shocked to see the level of contribution and overwhelmed with how many people were willing to give up their personal items to support those in need. Thanks to the help of the Albany student body, I delivered boxes of clothes to the local refugee organization. I witnessed a volunteer handing out clothing to a young family with two children. Seeing their smiles and gratitude as they tried on the new outfits left me joyful and deeply satisfied. I felt proud that so many of us had contributed to making a real difference in our community. Many people had learned of the clothing drive through the school newspaper column and I realized the importance my voice could play in bringing positive change.

With this new impetus, I began volunteering at the University's radio station. Here I had the privilege of hosting a weekly talk show. I used my voice to educate others on serious issues such as homelessness and drug abuse in our community and to lean on others for support in achieving goals. I felt proud to have initiated many successful fundraisers, food, and clothing drives to support underserved community members, but I wanted to do more. I was compelled to learn about how the law could provide support and justice for these disadvantaged groups.

With a fuelling passion to learn, I secured a summer position working as an entry-level legal assistant at a family law firm. In addition to managing case files and helping to prepare legal documents, I had the opportunity to assist lawyers and paralegals in court and at tribunals. I witnessed how strong evidence demonstrated in case law could provide justice and I was fascinated by the passion that drove lawyers to meticulously prepare for cases while building trust and connections with their clients. I quickly understood their dedication as I realized they believed in what they were fighting for, and they too wanted to help those who needed it most.

My experiences have shown me the impact a small contribution can make in bettering the lives of those in need. I want to continue using my voice to invoke positive change and will allow my family cultural experiences to guide me in connecting with those with diverse values, beliefs, and feelings. As a lawyer, I will strive to address issues in the legal system, communicate compassionately, debate respectfully, and bring service and justice to all different types of people in my community.

Click to go back to law school personal statement examples.

If you’d rather seek our help for application review click here.

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